Friday, December 15, 2006

Bushido in America

Long but compelling read by Robert L. Kocher called "Bushido, Class, and Governance" about the principles of Bushido (the guiding philosophies of the samurai). One of the things this article talks about is how people like George W. Bush, Ted Kennedy, Al Gore etc. would never have succeeded on their own in the real world had it not been for family name and connections: their "nobility" so to speak, when in truth none of them possess any redeeming qualities which makes them fit to be in a position of authority...
Were the average person to walk into a bank, declare he had no money, prospects, or experience, then ask to be put on the bank's board of directors at $80,000 a year since he was down on his luck, he would be ushered out the door in short order. But when your name is Bush, your granddaddy was senator from Connecticut, your Father is Vice President or president, "somebody," people in the class structure will work to find a soft spot for you. In Bush's case he was rescued from virtual backruptcy and from a slide into lower-class obscurity by being given a series of such positions until the class structure could install him as governor and eventually president on the basis of family name and class group membership. From the standpoint of outside objective reality, there was no basis in experience or qualifications other than the name Bush, and class union membership, to put him into office as anything --either in business or government.

The Bush case is illustrative of principle, not exhaustive. Close examanation of many high level people in politics/goverment reveals a similar path which has a death grip on the American political/administrative system and which often does not incorporate serious employment or evidence of ability along the line. Al Gore is basically an unemployable ludicrous figure saved by inheritance of the Gore family name and state power structure. The same is true of any Kennedy. The list of such people reveals they have no personal investment in anything other than a diamyo class power system and political power mediated by a vacuous loquaciousness that could be found in any high school debate team along with equivalent high school experience and other qualifications.

While there may be some jostling between class members for specific positions, as long as the contests are primarily restricted to being among class members, the class system dominence is protected and perpetuated.

As I said it's a long read, but one well worth recommending to others.

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