Wednesday, August 26, 2020

To this blog's friends in Texas and Louisiana:

Thoughts and prayers going out to you as Hurricane Laura approaches.

Longtime readers know how much hurricanes and other tropical systems interest me.  This one already rivals Katrina.  I hope this blog won't be as busy with Laura as it was with Katrina fifteen years ago.

(Has it REALLY been that long?)

Hurricane Laura as of 06:44 pm EST on August 26 2020


2 comments:

Thespia said...

What was your writing about back then, all those years ago? I moved to England the week after Katrina hit. I remember my church was supposed to pray for me and I was supposed to sing a song. I got up and sang the song, and I noticed while I was singing "How Great Thou Art" they were projecting images of Katrina behind me. I was really, really pissed off. I was 22 years and and going to live in a foreign country by myself, and I got "swept aside" by the hurricane. Still makes me mad how they used my song as an accompaniment to their emotional video.

Chris Knight said...

I was blogging about Katrina like a madman. It already seemed like it was going to be so historic and tragic an event, I went into "stream of consciousness mode" with my thoughts about it. It was a strange time in my life for blogging of any kind actually, a lot was going on at that time and my writing about Katrina *sorta* reflects that. Mostly though it was sharing stories about it. Like the bar in New Orleans that refused to close during the worst of the storm and its aftermath. And then there was the kid who stole a school bus so he could transport a bunch of storm refugees to Houston and shelter at the Astrodome.

Hurricanes fascinate me. Not just the storm itself, but the lead-up in the days before it hits. I was a student in college when Hurricane Fran roared into North Carolina in '96. Something I'll never forget: watching the satellite images and the projected track during the lead-up to that terrible Thursday night. The entire campus bracing for the worst because we were dead center in the path. It's like looking down the barrel of God's shotgun. The outer bands came around 6 pm and for the next twelve hours the winds blew and the rains fell. When the sun arose through the morning gloom there were trees down, houses destroyed, power out (my roomie and I were among the very few whose power didn't get lost) and some deaths. It's a miracle that nobody at our school was hurt. It could have been much worse.

I've a feeling that this current hurricane is far from done with us. Still plenty of time for another major storm or two. Or three.